Poker Table Dealers Could Soon Be Replaced By Robots

'Min' robot poker dealerCasinos invest huge sums of money in recruiting and training poker table dealers who are required to deal with players from different backgrounds, cultures and ethnicities.

These poker dealers have to interact on a regular basis with players, build a rapport and make them feel comfortable so that they can turn into a regular customer.

These poker dealers could slowly find themselves out of work as the industry has started to experiment poker dealing robots and if the beta testing period turns out to be a success, poker robot dealers could become a regular feature at casinos.

Paradise Entertainment Ltd, is a manufacturing gaming machine provider that is based out of Hong Kong and the creator of ‘Min’ a poker robot dealer that has a pleasant face, brunette hair and a slender figure. Min at first glance looks very much like a human but in reality is a robot that has been programmed to deal poker cards.

As of now Min can deal cards but she cannot speak or recognize faces. If the beta testing turns out to be positive, the company plans to program the robot to speak different languages, recognized facial expressions and remember customers. The poker robot dealer will help casinos to significantly reduce costs and also remove the element of human error or manipulation. Min was initially introduced in Macau, the biggest gambling hub in the world and Paradise Entertainment plans on having clones go through a trial in U.S. casinos in the near future.

The costs of labor in U.S based casinos are extremely high and if the Min robotic experiment is confirmed a success, there could be huge demand in both American and European customers.

Paradise Entertainment is the first company to introduce a robotic poker dealer that looks and interacts in a similar manner as a live poker dealer. The company is yet to disclose how much a robot like Min would cost.

Carlos Siu an associate professor at the Macao Polytechnic Institute stated that this experiment would work really well in the United States but had concerns as to how well it would be received in Asia as the environment at the table can often get very loud and customers like to interact and have a little banter with the dealer. In a statement, Siu said

Gamblers often slam the table and shout loudly to pump up the mood. I’m not sure if robotic dealers can tap into the gamblers’ psychology correctly and give an appropriate response.